Saturday, September 9, 2017

Five Fall Activities for Early Childhood

It's mid-September, so that means it's time to break out the fall activities!

5 Fall Activities for Early Childhood | Apples to Applique

I have five activities for you today that are perfect for Early Childhood. The first 3 are sensory activities. We all know that kids love exploring the world for themselves, instead of just hearing about it. My sensory booklet series will give students a chance to record their observations in an age-appropriate way, using pictures to describe their findings. Guide students through sensory experiences with fall items! Simply cut and staple the pages together to create booklets for students to record what they see, smell, hear, feel, and taste (when appropriate) as they explore apples, pumpkins, and fall leaves.

Apple Sensory Booklet | Apples to Applique


Pumpkin Sensory Booklet | Apples to Applique


Fall Leaves Sensory Booklet | Apples to Applique



Pumpkin Investigation for Early Childhood | Apples to Applique

The next activity is the popular Pumpkin Investigation Activity. Unlike most common versions, mine has been tweaked to make it appropriate for Early Childhood--using cubes to measure, and without counting hundreds of seeds.  

No Prep Autumn Hats | Apples to Applique

This last activity is just for fun, although it does provide great fine motor practice! These darling Autumn Hats require zero prep--not even a sentence strip! Just print and have students color and cut. All you have to do is staple or tape them to fit on students' heads. It makes a wonderful culminating activity after some fall sensory experiences; students can use various colors to match what they saw in their observations.

What are some tried and true fall activities your students love?

Friday, September 1, 2017

Keeping Organized with Two Half Day Classes

Since I teach Pre-K, I teach two half day classes of three-, four-, and five-year-olds. That means 40 little people in my room each day, and I have to keep track of their progress, goals, communications with parents...and all of their stuff. Pre-K kids aren't the greatest at keeping track of their stuff. While I don't have a remedy for all the kid stuff, I do have a pretty good system in place that has helped a LOT with organizing the rest of it.

Keeping Organized with Two Half Day Classes | Apples to Applique


My secret? Color coding. The morning class is red, and the afternoon class is blue.

I color code everything.

Keeping Organized with Two Half Day Classes. Color coded take home folders. | Apples to Applique

I mean, everything. Take home folders.

Keeping Organized with Two Half Day Classes. Color coded skills checklists. | Apples to Applique


Keeping Organized with Two Half Day Classes. Color coded skills checklists. | Apples to Applique

Student skills checklists and goal sheets.

Keeping Organized with Two Half Day Classes. Color coded daily schedule. | Apples to Applique

The times on my daily schedule. (Forgive the sloppy, uneven cutting. I was in a hurry that day; it will be fixed soon!)

Keeping Organized with Two Half Day Classes. Color coded student job chart. | Apples to Applique

Classroom jobs. While I can't sell this exact job chart due to copyright reasons, find similar ones here in my Teacher Pay Teachers store!

Keeping Organized with Two Half Day Classes. Color coded data notebooks. | Apples to Applique

Data notebooks used with our Leader in Me program.

Keeping Organized with Two Half Day Classes. Color coded student files. | Apples to Applique

Even student files. Yes, I bought red and blue file folders just for this purpose! I may be a little obsessed, but it seriously helps me stay sane.

Keeping Organized with Two Half Day Classes. Color coded student group charts. | Apples to Applique

Group seating chart. I LOVE this system! The names are attached with Velcro so it is quick and easy to change, and a quick glance across the room can tell me who is supposed to be where.

Keeping Organized with Two Half Day Classes. Color coded student recognition chart. | Apples to Applique

Clip system for recognizing students who are using the 7 Habits of Leader in Me. Morning kids have red clips, afternoon kids have blue.

There's more, but you get the idea. This system works so well for me, and really helps me and my paras stay on the same page. Other teachers with half day classes, I would love to hear tips on how you keep everything organized!

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Age Appropriate Pre-K Homework

Summer is flying by, as usual. While I haven't been getting much blogging done, I have been keeping busy! Between teaching online, prepping activities for next year, adding lots of resources to my Teachers Pay Teachers store, and, of course, spending time with my family, there hasn't been much down time.

One of the resources I have been working on is a year-long age appropriate homework system for Pre-K! I am really excited to share this resource with you! I spent all last school year developing it and testing it out with my students. It got the stamp of approval from parents and from other teachers and paras, so I hope it will be useful to some of you, too.

Age Appropriate Pre-K Homework for the ENTIRE School Year | Apples to Applique

Teaching Pre-K has its unique challenges. I want my students to be and feel a part of the school community, which is not always easy considering they only attend for half a day. (Speaking of that, watch for a post about organizing a classroom for two half-day classes coming in September! UPDATE: Click here to read about how I stay organized!) Another challenge is that Pre-K is not always taken seriously as "real school". It's considered to be more like daycare. One of the things that irks me is when people say we're not doing real work, we're just playing. First of all, play is developmentally appropriate, and so important! Children learn so much through play! Secondly, while we do spend a fair amount of time in structured play, we do a lot more than just play in Pre-K.

Age Appropriate Pre-K Homework for the ENTIRE School Year | Apples to Applique

I created this homework system to help address these two issues. My building has a school-wide homework policy, so I wanted my students to be a part of that--and thus, more a part of the school community as a whole. After all, my job is to prepare these kiddos for kindergarten. Getting them in the habit of doing homework will help establish a strong foundation for their future schooling. Also, assigning homework helps parents to see that we are doing a lot more than "babysitting" their children, and encourages them to get invested in their child's education.

However, the challenge came in creating assignments that are age-appropriate. It would be easy to just list a ton of homework assignments, but would they really benefit the students? The activities I assigned in this system cover a host of skills, from literacy and math to self-help and motor skills. While many of the activities repeat from month to month (such as reading), others change and grow throughout the school year. They are specifically designed to address kindergarten readiness skills.
The best part, though, because I believe so firmly in the importance of play, is that lots of the activities include an aspect of play! Some of the assignments include "play pretend" or "go to the park", because I want parents to know the importance of these types of activities.

Age Appropriate Pre-K Homework for the ENTIRE School Year | Apples to Applique

Another benefit of this system is that it is incredibly quick and easy for teachers to implement and for parents and students to use. That was important to me. I didn't want homework taking up 30 minutes to an hour every night. That in and of itself is not developmentally appropriate at this age. I also didn't want homework becoming one more overwhelming thing for families to take on, so I kept it very simple.

Age Appropriate Pre-K Homework for the ENTIRE School Year | Apples to Applique
Get the homework calendar for August FREE by visiting my TPT store and downloading the preview!

There is a calendar with a list of assignments for each month (August 2017 - June 2018. At the end of the school year, it will be updated for the 2018-2019 school year). Parents are requested to complete 3 items with their child each week, and to simply write the number of the assignment on the date they completed it. They can do assignments more than once. There is a lot of room for flexibility! For certain parents, I tell them how to adapt the activities for their child. For example, if their child is already counting past 10, I encourage them to count beyond that. If they are not yet able to count at all, I recommend they count to 5. I give my parents a lot of liberty to do what is best for their child.

To check out this homework system, go visit Apples to Applique on Teachers Pay Teachers. Download the preview on Teachers Pay Teachers to get August's homework calendar free!

I would love to hear how you handle homework in your early childhood classroom!

Thursday, June 22, 2017

Favorite Props and Reward Systems for Teaching Online

*Note: This post contains affiliate links, which means I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking on my links, at no cost to you! This helps support my little blog.*

As I mentioned in a recent post, I have started teaching online with VIPKID. It has been a lot of fun so far, and a great way to earn some extra cash without ever leaving my house.


Since you are teaching over a computer screen, you have to approach things a little differently. The kids respond well to props, puppets, toys--anything to make the lesson more exciting.

Favorite Props for VIPKID | Apples to Applique



I just got these finger puppets and I LOVE them. I like that they have animals and people. Better yet, the people are a family, and family words (grandma, grandpa, mom, dad, etc.) are used in several lessons. They don't take up much storage space, are easy to use over a webcam, and are fun for kids.




Some of my other favorite props are these magnetic letters from Lakeshore. Like most things from Lakeshore, they are not cheap, but they are all lower case, which is hard to find, and they have enough of each letter that I can set up several activities in advance. They help a lot with explaining the "point and read" slides to Level 2 kiddos.

Favorite props for teaching online | Apples to Applique

My favorite purchase so far is, hands-down, this puppet by The Puppet Company! He is so funny and cute, and has been a hit with the kids. He's perfect for my Level 1 babies.


These basic vocabulary cards are on my wishlist to buy soon. There are so many cards that I'm sure they could be used across multiple lessons.

Reward system for VIPKID | Apples to Applique

I also recently made this reward system. VIPKID has some sample reward systems that you can use or draw on a whiteboard, but I wanted to come up with something different. I wanted it to be fun, colorful, easy to use, and reusable.

Reward system for VIPKID | Apples to Applique

I teach most of my classes back to back, with only a couple of minutes between, so I needed something that didn't take a lot of time to "reset" for each student. I made this ice cream cone system with my embroidery machine and added some Velcro, so it's quick and easy to add or take away scoops.

12 Reward Systems for Online Teaching (VIPKID) | Apples to Applique

I also have some fun printable reward systems available in my TPT store! With 12 options from flower gardens to superheros, you're sure to find something that clicks with each student. Check it out here!

12 Holiday and Seasonal Reward Systems for Online Teaching (VIPKID) | Apples to Applique

UPDATE: I have also just added some seasonal and holiday printable reward systems in my TPT store! 12 fun new designs to take you through the year!

I know I sound like one of "those people", but VIPKID has been the best side job ever! They are a great company to work for. If you're interested in becoming a VIPKID teacher yourself, shoot me an email! I'd be happy to answer any questions. As long as you have a bachelor's degree (in anything!) and experience teaching kids in some capacity (Sunday school, summer camp, etc.) you are eligible to apply. If you're ready to take the plunge and meet some adorable students while making some extra cash, sign up here using my referral link and type in this code in the referral box: 02YUUI.

Saturday, May 27, 2017

6 Differentiated Literacy Stations from One Board Game

*Note: this post contains affiliate links. This means that I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking on my links, at no cost to you. These purchases help support my blog.*

6 Differentiated Literacy Stations from One Board Game | Apples to Applique


I know it's summer, so probably the last thing you want to think about is planning for school. However, summer is the perfect time to prepare fresh new activities for the coming year.

This idea for new literacy stations is simple and fun, and can be used for multiple activities and skill levels. It also takes less than 5 minutes to prep, so I promise it won't take away from your summer relaxation! Sound good? I am all about engaging activities that don't take hours to prepare!

All you need is some dice and an old game board. Many classic kids games will work, like Candy Land or Chutes and Ladders. It doesn't even need to have all the pieces, so thrift store finds are perfect for this.

Here's your super-complicated prep--are you ready?

Write a letter name in each game space.

That's it.

6 Differentiated Literacy Stations from One Board Game | Apples to Applique
Simple, one-time prep takes about 5 minutes!

I just tossed the Candy Land cards, because I don't need those millions of pieces complicating my life. Since our purpose for this game is not color recognition, dice work just fine. Counters also make excellent game pieces if yours are missing, so bring on those garage sale games with all the missing pieces!

There are so many ways to play, and it can be differentiated based on the needs of your students.

1. Player says the name of the letter they land on

2. Player says the sound of the letter they land on

3. Player names a word that starts with the letter they land on

4. Player finds a picture that starts with the letter they land on (requires some alphabet picture cards)

5. Player finds the lowercase letter to match the uppercase letter they land on (requires lowercase alphabet magnets or cards, or a chart for students to point to)

6. Player writes the letter they land on (upper or lowercase or both, depending on level)

6 Differentiated Literacy Stations from One Board Game | Apples to Applique

You can approach this literacy station different ways. You can introduce it with different objectives at different times of the year, depending on what you are targeting at that time, so that all players complete the same activity during game play. Or, it can be differentiated in one game session, so you can use mixed ability groups. For example, if I'm playing with a high level learner and low level learner in the same group, they can each have different requirements. When it's my low level learner's turn, I can ask her to say the letter name. When it's my high level learner's turn, I can ask her to name a word that starts with that letter. If I have a kiddo who needs fine motor practice, he can write the letters on his turn. All of this can be accomplished during the same game!

I would love to hear other ideas you have for implementing this board game in your literacy stations; I'm sure there are other variations I haven't thought of yet. Leave me a comment to let me know how you can use this in your classroom!